Local RPMs update

This is an update to the earlier post where I linked to some RPMs which I maintain for my own purposes. If you find these useful, please feel free to download them.

In the filenames, el6 is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 (Centos), el5 is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 (Centos), fc7 is Fedora Core 7.

If a link is broken, feel free to have a click around the SVN repository, the root of where I keep all the RPM stuff is here. Or please email me.

Some RPMS

There is an update to this post, for the most recent be sure to check here.

I notice that occasionally the RPMs I mentioned in this post do indeed get downloaded. I’ve been adding the odd package as and when I need it and I haven’t been able to find a RPM. Also I’ve built some of those original RPMS for new distributions or architectures (x86_64 typically), so I thought maybe I ought to write an updated post.

In the filenames, el5 is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 (Centos), fc7 is Fedora Core 7 and if the letters are missing it will work with rl5!

If a link is broken, feel free to have a click around the SVN repository, the root of where I keep all the RPM stuff is here. Or please email me.

daemontools

  • daemontools-0.76-1.el5.i386.rpm
  • daemontools-debuginfo-0.76-1.fc7.i386.rpm
  • daemontools-0.76-1.fc7.i386.rpm
  • daemontools-0.76-1.el5.x86_64.rpm
  • daemontools-0.76-1.el5.src.rpm
  • djbdns

    haproxy

    isync

    keepalived

    netatalk

    ucspi-tcp

    wakeonlan

    RedHat Enterprise Linux 5 Encrypted Microsoft Active Directory Authentication

    So after a few hours getting Linux authenticating happily from Active Directory, I turned my attention to getting it all working with encryption.
    Initially I had tried a telnet to port 636 (the LDAPS port) which failed, so it didnt look like my AD box was talking LDAPS. Somewhere to start I guess!

    So after a few hours getting Linux authenticating happily from Active Directory, I turned my attention to getting it all working with encryption.

    Initially I had tried a telnet to port 636 (the LDAPS port) which failed, so it didnt look like my AD box was talking LDAPS. Somewhere to start I guess!

    Continue reading “RedHat Enterprise Linux 5 Encrypted Microsoft Active Directory Authentication”

    RedHat Enterprise Linux 5 Microsoft Active Directory Authentication

    Today I set out to get RHEL 5.x (Specifically 5.5) to authenticate from a Windows 2003 R2 Active Directory. I used plenty of web pages, none of which were 100% correct for my setup, so I thought I’d document exactly what I did here for my own future reference, if anybody else finds it useful, so much the better. To start with, thanks to the following pages, between them, they got me about 80% of the way there:

    • Scott Lowe has a useful howto here. It is version 4 currently, click around his site to ensure he hasnt updated it before you use it as a reference.
    • The second resource I used is here.

    Continue reading “RedHat Enterprise Linux 5 Microsoft Active Directory Authentication”

    Adding iscsi devices

    [root@sn-b07-a ~]# iscsiadm -m session
    tcp: [9] 172.16.4.201:3260,1 iqn.1984-05.com.dell:powervault.6001c23000cd3f8300000000485684e3
    tcp: [10] 172.16.4.202:3260,2 iqn.1984-05.com.dell:powervault.6001c23000cd3f8300000000485684e3
    tcp: [11] 172.16.5.202:3260,2 iqn.1984-05.com.dell:powervault.6001c23000cd3f8300000000485684e3
    tcp: [12] 172.16.5.201:3260,1 iqn.1984-05.com.dell:powervault.6001c23000cd3f8300000000485684e3
    [root@sn-b07-a ~]# iscsiadm -m session -r 9 --rescan

    From here.

    mdadm Linux software Raid raidhotadd

    I’m sure there used to be a thing called raidhotadd, anyway these days it seems to be mdadm. We have a few machines with software raid, and very occasionally a md device flags a disk as dead but adding it back into the array fixes the problem.

    Anyway, I never remember this, so to remove and then re-add a disk from a md device do the following:


    [root@host ~]# cat /proc/mdstat
    Personalities : [raid1]
    md1 : active raid1 sdb1[1] sda1[0]
    104320 blocks [2/2] [UU]

    md0 : active raid1 sdc1[0] sdd1[2](F)
    143371968 blocks [2/1] [U_]

    md2 : active raid1 sdb2[1] sda2[0]
    71577536 blocks [2/2] [UU]

    unused devices:
    [root@host ~]# fdisk -l /dev/sdd

    Disk /dev/sdd: 146.8 GB, 146815737856 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 17849 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdd1 * 1 17849 143372061 fd Linux raid autodetect
    [root@host ~]# mdadm /dev/md0 --remove /dev/sdd1
    mdadm: hot removed /dev/sdd1
    [root@host ~]# mdadm /dev/md0 --add /dev/sdd1
    mdadm: re-added /dev/sdd1
    [root@host ~]# cat /proc/mdstat
    Personalities : [raid1]
    md1 : active raid1 sdb1[1] sda1[0]
    104320 blocks [2/2] [UU]

    md0 : active raid1 sdd1[2] sdc1[0]
    143371968 blocks [2/1] [U_]
    [>....................] recovery = 0.2% (297280/143371968) finish=32.0min speed=74320K/sec

    md2 : active raid1 sdb2[1] sda2[0]
    71577536 blocks [2/2] [UU]

    unused devices:
    [root@host ~]#

    And there we can see from /proc/mdstat that the md device will be synchronised and happy again soon.